~ Happy Holidays, Everyone! ~

~

We Have Much to be Thankful for this Year!

~

If you didn’t wake up looking like this …

You Missed Out on Swine Flu!

~~~

And if You Stayed out of Stores Offering …

Your Kids Will Have to Find Another Way to Drive You Crazy!

~~~

 

See, You Are Feeling Better Already!

 

~~~

From Our House to Yours:

May you always have
Love to Share,
Health to Spare,
And (Best of All) —

Friends that Care!

~

“Thank You” for a Wonderful Year …

We Look Forward to 2010

See You Next Year!

~

This blog is a companion to my website: GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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Published in: on December 24, 2009 at 1:51 pm  Comments Off on ~ Happy Holidays, Everyone! ~  
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Today’s Humor: Santa in the Summer

 

EVER WONDER WHAT

SANTA

 

LOOKS LIKE IN

THE

SUMMERTIME ???

.

 

SCROLL DOWN

.

 

.

.

 

Sorta takes the joy out of Christmas, doesn’t it?

~~~

As always, “Thank You” to Dorothy!

~~~

This blog is a companion to my website: GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

 

 

Published in: on December 21, 2009 at 10:47 am  Comments Off on Today’s Humor: Santa in the Summer  
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Are You Aiming to Take a Whitetail Home?

The purpose of this posting is to talk about shot placement when hunting deer.

Basic Facts

The aim of every hunter should be to bring a deer down with a quick, certain kill.  Whether using a bow or a gun, the aim is to hit a vital area, so the animal does not suffer.

In general, bow hunters aim for the heart region. Thus, if the deer suddenly drops low before running away, your arrow may still hit the lungs.

The average whitetail weighs 150 lbs., and pumps about 8 pints of blood. If you do not kill the animal immediately, then massive hemorrhaging is necessary to bring the deer down.

Biologists estimate that a deer must lose 35% of his blood before he will fall.

A Handsome Buck Watching for Trouble!

Generally, this is a shot for gun owners only.  This is because, unless the archer hits the animal dead-center, there’s a good chance that the arrow will deflect off a bone. Head-on, the chest area is a rather small area to hit.

Gun hunters have three vital organ areas available (head-on): in the neck, the lungs and the heart. Striking any one of these areas can cause the deer to drop dead, through shock or destruction of vitals.

A Wonderful Shot for Bow or Gun!

When a deer presents his side to the hunter, a well-aimed shot at the shoulder-blade can often drop the deer quickly.

Bow hunters need to avoid the shoulder-blade shot (arrow can be deflected by major bones) and zero in on the heart and lungs.

Another Good Position for Gun or Bow!

This  phrase refers to a deer that turns 1/4 the way towards or away from you (note the photo). This is a great shot for bow hunters. Even if the shot isn’t dead-on, it can angle through the body and still kill the game.

Gun-hunters also consider this a good shot. Most hunters aim to go through the deer to the opposite shoulder.

Bow-Hunters & Deer Hunting

The folks who use a bow to bring home food are a special breed!  Generally, they must:

  • be less than 30 yards from their quarry,
  • have to worry about their scent warning game,
  • keep their movements down to a minimum, and
  • have the physical strength to fell a deer with just one arrow.

Yet, they move elegantly and I admire their skill. You have to be a great hunter to down a deer with so many factors against your success!

~

Deer Rear Window Graphics used through the courtesy of ClearVue Graphics (# 1) and Vantage Point Graphics (# 2 and # 3)

~~

This blog is a companion to my website: GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on December 19, 2009 at 11:07 am  Comments Off on Are You Aiming to Take a Whitetail Home?  
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If You Meet a Rattlesnake**

This is One Puppy I'd Leave Alone!

If you are camping, hiking, or even out hunting, you should pay close attention to your surroundings.  While you are enjoying the scenery or excitement of hunting, keep an eye out for a fellow-traveler … the rattlesnake.

If You Hear a Rattle …

You are probably within 4 – 5 feet of a rattler.  This is no time to decide to out-run the reptile.  This is the time to freeze-in-place.

If you patiently stay in place, you can out-last the snake and he will slither off.

If you start to run and the snake is ready to strike, there is no way you can move fast enough!  Remember that rattlers can leap forward one-half the length of their body.

And if He Bites?

Rattlesnake bites are very dangerous.  Remember how we learned to ‘cut and bleed’ the bite and then apply a tourniquet? Forget it!  That is s-o-o ‘old school.’

Within 30 minutes, the bitten area will swell up and turn black & blue. The accepted policy now is to use an ace bandage or soft cloth. Put it between the bite and your heart.

Don’t tie it as tight as a tourniquet — cutting off circulation isn’t the idea. The best plan is to hurry to get medical attention immediately after applying the bandage.

Interesting Facts About Bites

Not everyone who is bitten gets venom in the bite!  In about 30% of cases, no venom is transferred during the bite. Your best protection is thick clothing and leather boots.

Another surprising statistic has to do with the location of the bites: About 98% of snake bites are to hands and feet.

Finally

Rattlesnakes, or any snake, for that matter, prefer not to bother with you.  They would prefer to slither away — in peace.  Don’t force them to attack. It will ruin your day!

Don’t let your undies get bunched up over snakes.  Remember that we share the earth with snakes, and they were here first!  Just use caution and reason.  The truth is:  Snakes like you less than you like them!

~~~

Jim sent this very interesting comment: “… rattlesnakes don’t always rattle prior to striking. I can’t sight my original source for this information but here is a quote from wikipedia (suppose to be referenced but I could figure out which reference when with what information). “Adult snakes may lose their rattles on occasion, but more appear at each molting. If the rattle absorbs enough water in wet weather, it will not make noise.” Just thought I’d pass it along….”

~~~

This blog is a companion to my website, EasyOnlineOrdering.com

People With Time on Their Hands – Amazing!

This is a busy day so I’ll share something my husband sent me via email!

Keep in Mind: These are All Pencils!

 

 

 

 

 

A Few Thoughts: Who is minding the store while someone is constructing these?

Another Thought: This person has serious amounts of time on his/her hands!

H-m-m-m-m-m: Who is cutting up all these pencils for the artist to work?

Just Wondering: Is this part of someone’s art therapy?

A Last Word: I’ve already checked Snopes – no info. My husband has no idea who did these.  Enjoy!

~~~

This blog is a companion to my website, GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

 

Published in: on December 16, 2009 at 9:59 am  Comments Off on People With Time on Their Hands – Amazing!  
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Using a Spotting Scope While Hunting

Spotting Scopes and the Hunter

 

A Spotting Scope on a Tripod

 

Hunters who hunt for mule deer often consider a spotting scope to be their best friend.   Must you have  a spotting scope if you are hunting mule deer (or other large game)? No, but it makes the job a lot easier!

In a recent post, I mentioned that you do not want to carry a 10x pair of binoculars around your neck for any length of time.  Well, imagine dragging along something with 20x!

The Beauty of a Spotting Scope

There seems to be a direct relationship between the size of the game and the distance from which you need to spot them.  In other words, large game roams over larger areas and are weighed down with clever ways to out-fox the hunter.

If they can smell you or see you … they are GONE! How do you combat this problem?  With a spotting scope.

A spotting scope on a tripod will help you see over long distances while hunting in open country.  In fact, trophy hunters admit that a spotting scope is one of their most important pieces of gear!

Leave the “Sissy” Spotting Scopes on the Shelf

Your spotting scope will get plenty of wear.  Unless you only set-up your scope in your front parlor (to admire its looks), you need one that is durable and sturdy. Also, pay attention to the manufacturer’s warranty…things happen.

Spotting Scopes and Muleys

To get a shot at a mule deer, you will probably be shooting from a great distance — as much as 300 yards. Muleys tend to roam over large expanses of open territory. And this is where spotting scopes are at their best.

From the photo with this article, you can see that a scope is really a small telescope.  Because of its modest size, this tool is really versatile.

Other Things to Look For in a Scope

You’ll want all the clarity and brightness your scope can muster while hunting in the pre-dawn and sunset hours.  In the store, don’t be afraid of trying out several.

Compare the brightness and clarity of the image on one object (it’s easier to compare when the object is the same) — a trophy buck on the wall, a ceiling fixture, whatever.  Also compare the ‘field of view’ — you will want to see a large expanse at one time.

Another thing I’d want in a scope is a carrying case.  These are fine instruments and they deserve to be treated well.

~

Full Disclosure: I sell binoculars and other optics. However, my mission in this article is to share information about using the proper equipment while hunting!

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This blog is a companion to my website, GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

 

Published in: on December 15, 2009 at 9:30 am  Comments Off on Using a Spotting Scope While Hunting  
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More Info About Binocular Lenses

This is a continuation of last week’s article about binocular features needed by hunters.

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Magnification: Makes Objects Appear Closer than They Are!

But what does this mean? One x is what you can see with the naked eye.  Thus, a 7x binocular promises to magnify an image 7 times larger than with the naked eye. Another way of looking at this is: A magnification of 7 means that the image you are seeing through your binoculars seems 7 times  closer that it really is. Generally, the higher the magnification of a pair of binoculars, the narrower the field of vision. Thus, the closer the image appears, the less you see around that image. If you are focusing on a deer with a pair of 8x binoc’s, you will see much more of the scene around that deer than you would with 10x binoculars.

Binocular Lens Diameters

The diameter of your lens determines the binocular’s ability to gather light. When the lens is larger, it lets in more light so you can see things in greater detail. If you want more light during the hours when deer are most active (dawn and dusk), then 7 x 50 is a great choice. This is because , at lower power, your view will be brighter and you will have a wider range of vision than with stronger binoculars. Objective Diameter: This is the lens at the opposite end of the glasses from the eyepiece; its size is expressed in millimeters. Essentially, it tells you how much light this pair of binoculars can deliver. Understanding the Numbers: With a pair of binoc’s rated at 7 x 42, this is expressing – “7” is the magnification and “42” is the objective diameter (amount of light that can be gathered to see an image).

An Example of a Roof Prism

Prisms: In a nutshell, roof prisms are lighter but porro prisms provide a clearer, sharper image. The roof prism can be more compact. With the porro lenses, however, you get more depth perception.

An Example of a Double Porro Prism

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Full Disclosure: Although I sell binoculars and other optics, I will not mention them in this article.  My mission is to share information about using the proper equipment while hunting!

~~~

The 2 images showing the two types of prisms in binoculars are from Wikipedia. I am using them through the “Fair Use” Clause. This article is educational.

~~~

This blog is a companion to my website, GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on December 14, 2009 at 8:51 am  Comments Off on More Info About Binocular Lenses  
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Today’s Humor: HOG HUNTING IN HOUMA , LOUISIANA

This is what I call a ‘retriever’

Training the “gator” is somewhat difficult….

As I’m still having a little trouble with getting him to bring the pig to me.

~

‘Thanks’ to MDH* for this gag!

~~

MDH = My Deer Husband (Better known as: He who likes to be obeyed — but rarely is!)

~~~

This blog is a companion to my website: GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on December 13, 2009 at 11:25 am  Comments (4)  
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Using Binoculars & Optics in Hunting

The suggestions included below will be of most value to beginning hunters.

Binocular Sizes

Binocular glasses are an important tool for hunters.  In order to be a successful hunter, you must  see the deer (or other game) before they see you!

A good range of power is between seven and eight power.  Typical optic choices are:  (7 x 35), (7 x 50), (8 x 30), (8 x 40), (8 x 42) and (8 x 56).  The most common choice for hunters is (8 x 40).

But what does this mean? One x = what you can see with the naked eye.  Thus, a 7x binocular promises to magnify an image 7 times larger than with the naked eye.

There is a direct relationship between power (size) and the brightness and view of an image. Remember that, in general, lower power optics offer brighter images and a wider field of vision.

Binocular Lens Diameters

(This will be an article on its own.  The facts a prospective owner needs to know cannot be covered in 200 words. Thus, I will cover this topic in detail in a future article …. with the exception of the next comment.)

The diameter of your lens determines the binocular’s ability to gather light. When the lens is larger, it lets in more light so you can see things in greater detail.

If you want more light during the hours when deer are most active (dawn and dusk), then 7 x 50 is a great choice.

Bigger Isn’t Better

If you are going to use these binoculars for deer hunting, don’t let anyone talk you into buying high-powered binoculars (10x). Most hunters wear the binoculars around their necks, so they are handy for quick use.

Ten power binoc’s are heavy and they become progressively more uncomfortable – the longer you wear them. ‘Neck strain’ sounds pretty goofy … until you experience it.  Ask me how I know!

Water Resistant vs. Waterproof

You will find yourself in too many humid and water-filled situations to trust “water-resistant” glasses. I wouldn’t trust any binoc’s that weren’t waterproof!

~~

Next Time: More info about Binocular Lens Diameters.

~

Full Disclosure: Although I sell binoculars and other optics, I will not mention them in this article.  My mission is to share information about using the proper equipment while hunting!

~~~

This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on December 12, 2009 at 11:18 am  Comments Off on Using Binoculars & Optics in Hunting  
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Guess What? Your Mama Was Your First Hunting Instructor!

 

Mom Finally Gets Some Credit!

 

Most hunters do not realize that “dear ol’ Mom” was their first trainer in the fine skill of hunting.  Dads came along later, to take the semi-trained youngster to the woods for further instruction.

Let me show you what I mean.

Mom’s Hunting Tips

Your mother cautioned you ‘not to make a spectacle of yourself’ – an important hunting tip.  Great hunters stay in the shadows – out of direct sunlight. There’s only one word for hunters who walk along the tops of hills with the sun behind them – busted!

Mama was right when she cautioned you to ‘quit wiggling.’ No matter how well you’ve camouflaged yourself, too much movement will give you away.

The Importance of Smell in Hunting

Most large game have an acute sense of smell. So, when your Mama told you to take a bath because you smelled, she was offering good advice.

This is not a time to bathe with your new bar of “Obsession” soap. Neutral, non-scented soap is the best idea.

Hunters planning on stalking in pine areas sometimes store their ghillie wear in plastic bags, along with pine leaves.  Those hunting in dense woods often put a variety of leaves with their ghillie suits – so they will smell more natural.

How Deer & Ducks Use Light

Your mother provided excellent hunting training when she chased you to the bus, waving your mittens. Sweet thing that she was, Mama worried you’d catch cold.

Illness is the least of a hunter’s concerns. However, having one’s hands & face (and any other exposed surface) covered is critical because your body reflects light.

When a duck is looking down at a marsh and sees a flash of light, he continues on to a safer place. Deer also have an uncanny knack for seeing a single flash and knowing it’s time to move elsewhere.

Ghillie Wear as Concealment

If the hunter is relying on his camo and ghillie wear for concealment, he needs to remember Mom’s thoughts on this issue: “Child, go back to your room and take off that ratty shirt.”

She was really explaining that worn or faded camo does you little good. When the contrast (lights vs. shadows) is gone, so is your protection! If your image isn’t broken up by the lights and shadows, you will be seen.

“Don’t be a show-off,”  was just your mother’s way of reminding you that shiny objects are seen objects!

Like your face – a thermos, rifle scope, watch – has reflective properties. These items should be removed or concealed – either with contact paper or matte tape or whatever. Remember: Your solution must be matte (flat, no reflection) or it’s no good.

Sound Camouflage

When your mother queried you about “Are you ready?” and said, “Keep quiet when the visitors come,” she was doing her best to explain the importance of preparation for hunting. She was also trying to remind you to check your ‘noise factor.’

To be successful in hunting, preparation is critical. Realizing you need to travel back 100 miles to civilization to buy a can opener is a real bummer.

Oiling squeaks, gathering hunting supplies and food, checking your weapons – all calls for planning.  Game relies on noise and movement to save them from your dinner table.

When Mama asked you to look at something “from a different point of view,” she was offering another excellent hunting tip. Hunters are more successful when they are not at eye-level with their quarry.

Be up in a tree (10 -12 feet up), or sitting on the ground with your back to a tree. You want to see the “whites of his eyes” before your target sees yours! Be where he doesn’t expect you.

I could go on, but I think I’ve proven my point that your Mom was your first hunting teacher!

It just goes along with my other hypothesis: Your Mother is Always Right.

— (Signed) Mama

© 2009 by Marylouise of GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on December 10, 2009 at 1:30 pm  Comments Off on Guess What? Your Mama Was Your First Hunting Instructor!  
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