Would You Recognize a Venomous Snake?

As the weather warms up, folks start to get nervous about coming up close-and-personal to snakes.

I won’t go so far as to say that ‘snakes are your friends’ but I will point out that snakes do a great job of controlling insects, rats and mice populations.

Snakes Just Want Peace-and-Quiet!

Few snakes are interested in confronting you.  Given the opportunity, most will slither into dark recesses, instead of going toe-to-fang with you.

The Bad Boys of the Snake Kingdom

This Diamond-backed Rattlesnake Usually Warns People Off by Rattling His Tail!

It took me years to understand that there are 4 main groups of venomous snakes … and the others may bite, but they have no venom.

Therefore, let’s talk about the ‘bad boys.’  Most people who are bitten by venomous snakes, get their bites courtesy of rattlesnakes.

Rattlers usually show their readiness to bite you by shaking their tails … however, this is not a guarantee!

Some just lunge and bite!  Frankly, this is going to make a mess of your day!  My suggestion is to move away quickly when you hear the distinctive rattling sound.

Three More to Go!

The coral snake can be identified through the rhyme:  “Red and yellow,

A "Red and Yellow" Snake Will Kill a Fellow!

kill a fellow; red and black, venom lack.”

If you are bitten, head to a medical facility immediately.  Stay calm and take deep breaths to relax yourself.

Rushing around will only cause the venom to spread faster!

These Guys Don't Play Around!

Water moccasins are in and around water, particularly in the shallows near low-hanging branches.

They don’t leave much to the imagination!  A Moccasin shows his fangs freely.

Finally, I want to mention the Copperhead. They are a real problem where I live (Texas).

Even Young Copperheads are Capable of A Dangerous Bite!

We live in open agricultural land and Copperheads seem to like to bask in the sun on cool days.

Generally, they are found in gardening mulch and compost piles and under decaying stumps.  Two more places to watch are: under large, flat stones and under decaying stumps.

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All snake photos are courtesy of Wikipedia!

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Next Time: How to Avoid Snakes; What To Do When You Are Bitten

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This blog is a companion to my website: GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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4 Comments

  1. […] Would You Recognize a Venomous Snake? […]

  2. Just want to say what a great blog you got here!
    I’ve been around for quite a lot of time, but finally decided to show my appreciation of your work!

    Thumbs up, and keep it going!

    Cheers
    Christian

  3. Cottonmouth Snake at Monroe Station…

    I found your entry interesting thus I’ve added a Trackback to it on my website :)…

  4. Dear Alan,

    You have some absolutely gorgeous shots of animals (and reptiles) in the wild! Great work! Now I’m not so crazy about getting up-close-and-personal with your cottonmouth snake at Monroe Station!

    Best wishes,
    Marylouise


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