Camp Cooking: Some Lunch Tips

Lunch is often a quick meal because campers are busy with other activities. Here are a few quick tips!

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Some Quick Tips for Lunch While Camping

  • Don’t make camping lunches the night before.
  • Substitutes for a sandwich:  a couple of hard-boiled eggs (with salt & pepper), left-over roast or fried chicken.
  • When boiling eggs, white vinegar added to the boiling water will keep the white part from running out of the cracked shell.
  • Gamey-smelling lunch boxes (or bags) will smell sweet if you place a slice of bread (dampened with vinegar) in the lunch container overnight.

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Today’s Recipe

Food just tastes better while camping!  Maybe it is because camp cooking takes longer and we are ravenous by the time it’s ready!

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Dutch Oven Biscuits 

This is a very simple recipe!  It serves 6 to 10.

Mix Bisquick-type mix according to recipe directions on the box.  DO NOT OVER-STIR THE MIX!

1)  Put the hot coals outside of the fire pit.  Oil a large Dutch oven inside thoroughly.

2)  Set the Dutch oven on the coals to heat for about 10 minutes.

3)  Spoon the mixture into the Dutch oven and cover with the lid.

4)  Shovel hot coals onto the Dutch oven’s lid.  Cook for 20 -30 minutes, depending on how hot the coals are.

5)  After 20 minutes, check the biscuits.  They are ready when they are lightly browned.

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‘Secret Lake – used by permission of Vantage Point Graphics

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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Published in: on July 13, 2011 at 12:01 am  Comments (2)  
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Camp Cooking: Breakfast Cooking Tips

Outdoor cooking can be a challenge! Here are a few tips.

These tips are tried-and-true … hope they help you!

Pancakes

  • Making pancakes?  Rub the griddle with cut potatoes instead of grease.  There will be no odor after cooking.
  • Turn the pancakes when the bubbles (in the batter) start to break or pop.
  • Using an aluminum griddle for your hotcakes?  Don’t use grease on your griddle, add melted shortening or oil to the batter.  Use fine steel wool to polish your griddle.
  • Serve pancakes and eggs immediately, do not stack and hold them on the griddle.
  • Cook bacon in a baking pan in the oven.

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 Today’s Recipe

This recipe is for breakfast, lunch or a trail snack.  They are nutritious and very tasty.  Bake some to take on your next outing.

Hunter’s Take-Along Biscuits

Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees.

2/3 cup water

2 and 1/4 cups complete pancake or baking mix (Bisquick-type)

1 cup rolled oats, uncooked

1/4 cup margarine or butter

1/4 cup sugar

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 cup chopped nuts:  walnuts or pecans

1/2 cup raisins

Mix all dry ingredients together (pancake mix, oats, sugar, cinnamon, nuts, raisins) completely.

Add liquid ingredients together (water, butter or margarine) and add to dry mixture.

Continue mixing until everything is well-moistened.

Drop by heaping tablespoonfuls on greased cookie sheet.  Bake for 12 to 14 minutes, or until light golden brown.

Makes about 12 delicious biscuits. 

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‘Evening Call’ is used by permission of Vantage Point Graphics

This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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Published in: on July 6, 2011 at 12:02 am  Comments Off on Camp Cooking: Breakfast Cooking Tips  
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Camping: Choosing a Great Campsite!

Factors to Consider

Choosing a great campsite isn’t as easy as it sounds.  Various factors are important to your choice.

  • The season,
  • The weather,
  • The wind direction and strength,
  • What amenities are available in the area you want to use?
  • What do you want to do while camping?  (hiking, fishing, geocaching, exploring, etc.)

Prepare for Unwelcome Visitors!

Taking Stock of the Situation

High on everyone’s list is choosing a scenic spot.  However, high winds and/or damp weather will be more important factors in choosing a site.

Experienced campers recommend a fairly flat area, with some shelter from gusting winds and damp.   Make use of a gully, a clump of bushes or trees, a low wall or even a rain fly — when wind and rain bear down on your site.

In case of rain, make sure that your site is not a low place where rain will settle.  Depending on the weather and your cooking plans, do you need to find a locale near wood?

Water Issues

During hot weather, each person will need 6 quarts of water per day.  Will you be bringing that with you?

In colder weather, 3 quarts of water per person, per day will suffice.  What do you know about the area where you will camp?  Is the water there drinkable?

I recently read an article by a ranger who stated that campers should assume any water source available in America is polluted.

That means you will need to have a way to decontaminate the water:  iodine, a means to boil water or a filtering system.

Make sure your water bottle is safe; once opened, bacteria and mold grow in bottles of water (I’m referring to using bottled water from the grocers) .

Locate your site some distance from a water source, so you do not contaminate it.

Wild Animals

Most animals are happy to scavenge for a free meal.  Raccoons love to show you how fast they can open the snaps on any Igloo container!

Leaving food in the camping area is an open invitation to night-time dining guests.   Go online for directions on constructing a ‘food cache’ — a way to hang your food up high — between 2 trees — at some distance from your sleeping tents.

If you are camping in bear country, be sure to decide on your ‘escape tree’ — a way for you to get away from an over-friendly (or aggravated) bear!

Still want to go camping? 😉

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Need a Camping Checklist?  Use ours!

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on February 1, 2011 at 12:08 am  Comments (1)  
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4 Tips for First Time Campers

When I dream of camping, it is a Norman Rockwell view, with lots of smiling faces around a warm campfire.

Be Prepared for the Unexpected!

Experience has taught me that taking our family camping and hoping to experience non-stop love, joy & companionship is … mostly a pipe-dream.

Here are 4 hints to make your camping trip more Norman Rockwell and less ‘Rocky Horror Show!’

Tip # 1:  Take an Eagle Scout

Even if you have to hire an Eagle Scout, they are an excellent investment for the newbie camper.  I refuse to tell you how I know this!

Eagle Scouts seem to understand the concept that it is critical to set up a tent (for the first time) in daylight.

Most of the rest of us enter into the spirit of camping with way too much confidence!  What can be so hard about putting up a tent?  They even give directions!  What more could we need?

Tip # 2:  Be Prepared

It is great to have a topographical map of the area you will explore during your camping trip.  It is even more critical to have a camping checklist.

Although there is no such thing as an exhaustive camping checklist, we’ve tried to build one.  Feel free to make a copy.

Think about maximizing the use of a minimum of items!

Tip # 3:  Assume the Worst Could Happen

Yes, worse things can happen than your teen daughter break a fingernail!   How on earth will your teens fill their hours if their cell phones can’t get a signal?

Have a plan for keeping bears, raccoons and other wildlife out of your food stores while you are sleeping or away from your tent.

What place should everyone plan to meet if separated? Everyone should know basic survival techniques and have some means to call for help.

Have alternate plans if the weather doesn’t cooperate.  There’s nothing worse than being stranded with grouchy kids in a confined space — with nothing to do!

Tip # 4:  SOS

I never leave home without it …. It’s my “Save Our Sanity” List.  I always have a list of the hotels and restaurants in the area we are visiting.

So far, I’ve never had to use one. But I feel ready for anything Mother Nature decides to throw our way!  😉

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on June 17, 2010 at 1:37 am  Comments Off on 4 Tips for First Time Campers  
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