Getting Your Share of Smallmouth Bass Action!

Disclaimer: There are many ways to fish successfully.  This is one of them.  There are other ways … but this one works for me.  I expect newbie anglers will be my audience.

Smallmouth and Largemouth Bass have enough differences that we treat them separately.  Today– Smallmouth Bass.

 

Small Mouth Bass are Feisty Fighters and Fun to Catch!

Smallmouth Facts

A member of the sunfish family, smallmouths are rather picky about the waters they honor with their presence.  The temperature in streams, rivers, lakes, etc., must be rather cool.

In the spring, the females move to spawning flats * when the water temperature heats up between 48 to 55.   When the water temperature reaches 60 to 65, smallmouths get frisky and start the spawning process.

Smallmouths are also picky about pollution.  They will not live in polluted waters.  Even better, they prefer oxygenated waters.

Using This Info to Catch More Bass

Understanding the paragraphs above will help you catch more bass.  First, let’s talk about oxygenated water.

As water splashes against rocks and other barriers, the water mixes with the air.  This makes the water more oxygenated.

Thus, you will want to fish for smallmouths wherever water can be re-oxygenated – around boulders, in riffles and under/in underwater structures (weed beds, rock formations, log jams, etc.).

Spring Fishing

Try smaller lures and hooks in the springtime.  Look for water with a gravelly bottom.

When you are thinking about live bait, consider the crayfish.  We carefully polled as many smallmouths as we could find and they assured us that they prefer crayfish.

Summer Fishing

Smallmouths are not interested in the heat of summer.  As the water heats up, they move to deep pools (during the day).  They only emerge from sundown till sunrise.  This is the best time to fish.

They will move into shallow areas, rock piles and in reefs.

Fall Fishing

Now the water is cooling down and the smallmouth bass prefer the deep pools because the temperature is steady. Again, these bass will come out of the pools to eat at night.

Winter Fishing

Smallmouths stay in deep pools – where the temperature is constant.  They are not very active.  Mostly, they chase small bait fish (that are also in these deeper pools) during the cold months.

Favored Lures & Bait

Crayfish, Mepps spinners, Rebel, jig and pig, Rapalas & spinner baits.

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* Spawning flats have a gravel floor in 8 to 10 feet of water.

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** Smallmouth Bass Tailwalking Profile is used by permission of Vantage Point Graphics

This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

 

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Published in: on February 15, 2011 at 1:11 am  Comments Off on Getting Your Share of Smallmouth Bass Action!  
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Why I Like Night Fishing!

In this very hectic season, I like nothing better than an evening of fishing.  However, I might be in the minority;  night fishing isn’t for everyone.

Peace and Quiet

When the sun sinks below the horizon, there’s something wonderful about the

Fishing in the Evening is a Great Way to Wind-Down from the Busy-ness of the Daytime Hours!

quiet that takes hold. I find night fishing more restful and serene than fishing during daylight hours.

Although there can be more dangers with reduced light, there seem to be many pluses — it’s a chance to tune into the night noises — frogs and crickets singing and the stars winking down from the night sky.

Fish Aren’t So Picky

Without elbow-to-elbow fishing that often occurs during the daylight hours,  fish don’t have so many choices for a meal. Biologists say that fish seem to increase their feeding behaviors  just after the sun goes down and around dawn.

Whether out on a boat or on shore, I like to go out when the moon is full.  The water might be as slick as glass after sundown, and the moonlight is enough light to keep an eye on any rippling in the water.

Dining on Bugs and Lures

By using top water lures, I’m able to throw my line out where the top feeding fish are dining on the mosquitoes and bugs that are skimming along the water.

The Down-Side of Night Fishing in Texas

In the southern parts of Texas, we seem to have 10 months of summer, 20 to 30 days of fall, a couple of days of spring and whatever is left over we call “winter.”

At present, it is still fall; our winter is in January.  All those mosquitoes that have left colder climes are chewing on us — still.   I’m convinced we buy and use more bug spray than any other state in the nation.

Next time you grumble that ‘some folks’ can still fish at night in short sleeves, remember that mosquitoes usually come along for the ride!

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‘Sunset Dream’ Rear Window Graphic is used by Permission of ClearVue Graphics!

This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on November 29, 2010 at 2:04 am  Comments Off on Why I Like Night Fishing!  
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Have You Ever Tried Night Fishing?

It may seem as if I have lost interest in my blog.  Not true!    However, I’m participating in the world’s longest transfer of a website from one hosting company to another!

I’m going to be very happy when everything is finished, however … right now I’m not enjoying the experience!

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Why Night Fishing is Cool (Pun Intended)

Dropping Your Hook as the Sun Goes Down = Some Great Fishing!

Where I live, daytime temperatures are already hovering around 100.  I also have very fair skin with lots of freckles.

Night fishing isn’t just cool, it’s healthier for someone like me.

Let’s talk about the least fun prospect of fishing in the nighttime hours:  mosquitoes and other aggravations.

Insects are one of the main food groups of fish.  (You know that fish cannot be very far up the food chain when they neglect to have ‘chocolate’  as one of their food groups!)

By dark, mosquitoes and other bugs are tired of dancing around to stay out of fishes’ mouths.  They can smell you coming and eagerly anticipate eating on you instead of being dinner for some fish.

Therefore, insect repellant is critical … don’t leave home without it!

One Joy of Night Fishing: Quiet

As  the sun sinks behind the horizon, Peace and (his best friend) Quiet take over.  I do some of my best thinking while fishing!

Generally, the pace slows and I get to tune into the night-time sights and sounds of nature:   the fire flies dance and sway and the stars wink down from the night sky.

Another Bonus: Fish Action Increases

Biologists say that fish seem to increase their feeding behaviors  just after the sun goes down and around dawn.

Whether out on a boat or on shore, I like to go out when the moon is full.  The water tends to calm down and the moonlight is enough light to keep an eye on any rippling in the water.

By fishing near the  top, I’m able to throw my line out where the top feeding fish are snacking on those mosquitoes and bugs that are not chewing on me!

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This is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on June 22, 2010 at 5:48 pm  Comments Off on Have You Ever Tried Night Fishing?  
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