Knife Round-Up: The Many Facets of Knives

At one time, I sold Gerber & Leatherman tools and did a series of informational articles about knives.  I was going to erase the group, however, they are read so often, I just left them up for my readers.

These articles are not about Gerber specifically, although I often use Gerber knives to illustrate the post.

Guess Who Collects Knives?

For about 5 weeks, I was carrying around a large (picture) book* of  knives – ancient and modern.  I had no idea how popular knives are!

I nearly dropped my teeth, however, when women would walk up to me and talk about their knife collections!

Maybe it’s just a Texas thing.

* The name of the book is in one or more of the articles.  I borrowed it from the Houston Public Library.

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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Why are There So Many Knife Blade Shapes?

Well, the one sentence answer to this is: There are different blade shapes because of all the jobs knives are called upon to do. Some blade shapes are suitable for a number of tasks while others are the best for a single job.

The Clip Point Knife 

The Most Famous Clip Point!

The Most Famous Clip Point!

 

 

The Bowie Knife is the most famous of the clip point knives.  Even though it is a very old design, it is still one of the most popular blades for just about anything done outdoors.

Only one side of the blade is sharpened and it can be called the ‘belly’.  On the upper side (spine) of the knife, a portion is ‘clipped’ from the blade.

Generally, the part that is removed causes the tip to be slightly lower than the spine.  This gives more control of the blade when using it to skin an animal or when using the point.

Although the photo shows an upper edge that looks as sharp as the lower one, it is probably a ‘swedge’ – the upper edge is beveled but not sharpened.

Gut Hook Blade 

Gut Hook Knife

An Example of a Gut Hook Knife

 

 

This is definitely a specialty knife — this unusual-shaped skinner helps any hunter field dress large game with ease.

Like the Bowie, the blade is a modified drop point (minor curving of blade, so the tip drops a little to meet the sharpened edge – very popular). The kicker is the sharpened “U” or “V.”

The beauty (a term I use loosely in relation to this knife) of this knife is that, after making an incision in a carcass, the blade is pulled backwards (along the spine of the knife) under the skin.  You are literally unzipping the skin from the meat and entrails.

This is an incredibly useful tool, even if it is one of the ugliest knives I’ve ever seen!

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This is # 4 in a series:

 

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NOTICE: I no longer sell Gerber knives and Leatherman tools.  I left this article up as educational information.

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com