Turkey Hunting: The Most Dangerous Shooting Sport in America!

You may have heard that turkey hunting is very dangerous;  it’s true.   The goal of this posting is to remind you of the worst dangers.

Believe it or not, the gobbler has a daily routine. If you can figure it out, you can find a place to take advantage of his routine!

How Can Turkey Hunting be Dangerous?

Let me count the ways …. First, hunting on public lands, by its nature is more dangerous than hunting on private lands.

There are more people (probably unknown to each other) holding loaded weapons at the same time, in the same area.

Being dressed in full camo often restricts your line-of-sight.

While concentrating on our quarry, we often lose sight of what is around us.

Hunting Behaviors that Can Cause an Accident

  • Stalking turkeys, instead of calling them to you
  • Trying to ‘drive’ turkeys, as if they were deer
  • Shooting at any part of a turkey, other than the turkey’s neck or head
  • Wearing red, white or blue
  • Not knowing where other hunters are
  • Not knowing what is beyond your next shot
  • Not knowing what is between you and your next shot

An Explanation

Stalking a Turkey: The gobbler you are stalking may turn out to be another hunter with a gun aimed at you!  Or, another hunter could be watching the turkey you are stalking – and shoot you!

‘Driving’ a Turkey: Turkeys don’t respond well to this kind of pressure; few bag a turkey in this way.  However, the chances of becoming involved in a shooting are great.  Call the turkey to you.

Aim for the Gobbler’s Head or Neck: Gobblers are big and hard to kill. Know the killing zone of a turkey:  the head or neck!

Wearing Red, White or Blue: Dress like a turkey & you could be shot — instead of the turkey!

Biologists tell us that turkeys and deer are color-blind for the colors red & green. That is why you can wear blaze orange and not worry about detection.

If turkeys see you and you are in orange, they are aware of your movement, not the color!

Not Knowing Where Other Hunters Are: Things change — owners sell their property to new folks … hunters try new areas … people forget.

Not Knowing What is Beyond the Shot You’re About to Make: While hunting, you are your brother’s keeper! If we don’t watch for each other, we can create a tragic accident!

Not Knowing What is Between You and Your Next Shot: Same explanation as above!

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Tomorrow: Some Truths About Turkey Hunting

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‘1999 Minnesota Turkeys’ is used by permission of Vantage Point Graphics

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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Published in: on April 12, 2011 at 12:02 am  Comments Off on Turkey Hunting: The Most Dangerous Shooting Sport in America!  
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Using Camo and a Blind When the Deer Aren’t

Article first published as Using Camo and a Blind When the Deer Aren’t on Technorati.

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Used properly, camouflage can significantly improve your chances of getting close enough to a deer to shoot.  However, camouflage doesn’t cure all problems — all the time.

Face Paint, Face Veils & Head Coverings Disguise the Human Form!

How Camo Helps

Whether you use face paint, head veils/coverings or other camouflage materials, they usually do a great job of breaking up your outline.

They also help you blend in with your surroundings, thus forcing deer to use his other senses to find you.

Ground blinds in camo patterns extend your ability to hide while offering you visibility of your surroundings.  Here are a few hints about camo and ground blinds:

  • Bowhunters should locate their blinds about 15 – 20 yards away from trails made by game.
  • Use curved edges when covering your hiding spot, rather than squared edges.  It looks more natural.
  • Set your ground blind at a higher elevation than you expect to see game.  This takes you out of his direct line-of-sight and usually gives you a wider view.
  • Cover yourself completely; your skin, watch and weapons must be matte.  If a deer sees the sun reflecting off  the face of your watch — you are toast!

Other Considerations While Hunting

Safety is your first consideration — for yourself and other hunters.  Here are a few tips so you don’t become accidental prey or hurt others!

  • A bright orange vest/jacket/hat should be worn on your way to your hunting spot.
  • Don’t wear or carry anything that is the color of the game you are seeking.
  • Hang a tag of bright tape on the animal when you are field dressing or carrying game to your vehicle.
  • When you hear another hunter approaching, call out in a normal voice to alert others.  Do not shout, use a whistle or use an animal caller.
  • Be extremely careful of using an animal caller when other hunters are in your hunting area.
  • Be sure that you will have a clear shot and that you can see on the other side of the animal — before you shoot.

Remember: Safety takes a few extra seconds, but regret lasts for a very long time!

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Come Back Sunday for a Look at 5 Dynamite Firefighter Graphics!

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on November 19, 2010 at 11:15 am  Comments Off on Using Camo and a Blind When the Deer Aren’t  
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5 Quick Tips for Newbie Hunters

These 5 tips come from experienced hunters.

Waiting for Hunting Season to start? So is he! *

Smelling ‘Right’

After washing  your hunting clothes and drying them in open air,* add your boots to a large plastic bag, along with the crushed leaves and other vegetation from your hunting site.  Seal it closed and allow to ‘steep.’

The odors will seep into your clothes, making you fit into the smell of the area you plan to hunt.

Your Hunting Boots

Don’t wear your hunting clothes or boots when you are adding gasoline (or any other fuel) .   Experienced hunters also avoid wearing their clothes/boots in diners or ‘greasy spoons.’

These scents (gasoline, kerosene, cooked food odors) cling to clothing and boots.

Did You Know?

Your wrists, like your scalp, lose heat rapidly.  Blood flows close to the skin surface in both places, requiring covering to keep you comfortable while hunting.

As you can imagine, keeping your wrists covered is a challenge while shooting or using a bow.  Gloves are effective, but they might interfere with your shooting.

Lots of hunters have started using wrist bands (used by athletes, tennis players, etc.) — either without gloves or under gloves and/or mittens.

Playing it Safe in a Tree Stand

Every year,  several hunters die falling from their tree stand or when their gun discharges while climbing into  their stand.

A safety belt: It’s an important piece of gear  for anyone using a tree stand.  Safety isn’t it’s only value; it also helps steady your aim for distance shots.

A properly adjusted belt will end the fear of falling — thus adding to your enjoyment of the hunt!

Deer are Excellent Swimmers

When hunting for a suitable hunting spot, look for water!  Deer seem to consider water as a barrier to detection.  Deer do not hesitate to enter water.

They are known to swim beaver ponds and swamps, as well as wade creeks to escape from hunters and dogs.

When looking for deer, be sure to scan the banks for trails leading out of the water and up the bank.  As creatures of habit, they may come for water and/or cross the river or creek at the same place.

This is a great site for a hunting spot!

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* Your dryer has ‘dryer sheet residue’ (complete with fru-fru smells). Hang them out to dry instead.

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If you found this useful, please pass it on to a friend!  Thank you!

‘Great Eight’ rear window graphic is used by permission of Vantage Point Graphics!

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

 

What is the Most Dangerous Shooting Sport? Turkey Hunting!

Factors that Make Turkey Hunting Dangerous

  • The need to wear full camouflage
  • The magnum loads in all gauges of shotguns
  • Getting caught up in the excitement of pursuing such a tough-to-kill quarry

Common Mistakes of Turkey Hunters

  • Stalking turkeys
  • Trying to “drive” turkeys, as if they were deer
  • Shooting at any part of a turkey, other than the turkey’s neck or head
  • Wearing red, white or blue
  • Not knowing where other hunters are
  • Not knowing what is beyond your next shot
  • Not knowing what is between you and your next shot

The Facts Behind the “Don’ts”

Turkeys are Tough to Kill; Aim for the Head or Neck!

Stalking a Turkey: The gobbler you are stalking may turn out to be another hunter with a gun aimed at you!  The reverse may also be true:  Another hunter may be watching the turkey you are stalking – and shoot!

‘Driving’ Turkey: “The chances of bagging a turkey by this method are slim, but the chances of becoming involved in a shooting are great. Always call the turkey to you.” *

Aim for the Gobbler’s Head or Neck: Gobblers are big and hard to kill. Shooting anywhere else is either a waste of shot or a waste of meat! **

Wearing Red, White or Blue: Dress like a turkey & you can be shot, instead of the turkey!

Biologists tell us that turkeys (and deer) are color-blind for the colors red & green.  That is why you can wear blaze orange and not worry about detection.  If turkeys see you in orange, they are seeing your movement, not the color!

Not Knowing Where Other Hunters Are: Hunters that tell me – “Everyone knows I hunt in this spot,” scare me!   Things change — owners sell their property to new folks, hunters try new areas, people forget.

Not Knowing What is Beyond the Shot You’re About to Make: While hunting, you are your brother’s keeper!  If we don’t watch for each other, we can create a deadly tragedy!

Not Knowing What is Between You and Your Next Shot: Same as the explanation immediately above!

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* A great quote by “Super Member” – deja vu.

** More info on this issue.

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This blog is a companion to my website: GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Published in: on April 16, 2010 at 12:32 am  Comments Off on What is the Most Dangerous Shooting Sport? Turkey Hunting!  
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