The Lead-in-Venison Controversy

 

Lead-in-Venison Controversy!

Lead-in-Venison Controversy!

 

States played leap-frog over each other to see who could raise the alarm loudest. The only thing they forgot to do —  test even one package of venison!

This is another of those ‘much-ado-about-nothing’ stories. Watch the progression (your taxes being wasted) here.

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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Published in: on December 26, 2008 at 1:02 am  Comments Off on The Lead-in-Venison Controversy  
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Round 3: CDC Weighs in on Lead-Poison-in-Deer Issue

Round 1

 

020065L_Dream Team_One on One

Fall Excitement!

 

The Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources (DNR) issued a study citing their concern that hunting bullets (containing lead) break up inside a deer and pose a lead poisoning risk in humans eating the venison.

Although they labeled the report as “preliminary,” they were quick to spread the word. This reaction came from finding some lead in packaged game – donated to food banks in North Dakota, Minnesota and a few other mid-western states.

On the basis of this report, some states collected all of the donated venison and had it destroyed.  (Many hunters have the deer they shoot processed/packaged and donate the meat to foodbanks across America.)

Round 2

The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) – the trade association for the firearms, hunting and recreational shooting industry – released a long report that said, essentially -“there is no credible, peer-reviewed scientific evidence that using traditional hunting ammunition creates a human health risk.”

As part of their report they highlighted the state of Iowa, which has been randomly testing children (500,000+) and adults (25,000+) for lead contamination for 15 years. They did not toss the food because they could find no connection between lead ammunition used and heightened lead contamination in humans.

NSSF also indicated that CDC (Centers for Disease & Prevention) was conducting tests regarding this issue.

Round 3

The CDC did not find a connection between ammunition used and lead contamination in humans. The short summary is in a box on this page – http://www.nssf.org/news/PR_idx.cfm?PRloc=share/PR/&PR=110708.cfm&CFID=3197794&CFTOKEN=9bbbf4263d2b5d79-F4AECCFA-0A2C-208F-D227DDCAC8E9983F&jsessionid=f03087e0b5d1f57e886c7f4e334d626b4155 You can read the full 31 page report: http://www.nssf.org/share/PDF/ND_report.pdf

Now the Story Gets Interesting

“The baseless claim that caused concern about consuming venison harvested with lead ammunition was born out of the anti-hunting movement. The story started when a dermatologist with ties to the Peregrine Fund–an organization dedicated to eliminating the use of lead ammunition for hunting–claimed to have collected packages of venison from food banks that contained lead fragments.

Out of fear and an overabundance of caution, health officials (who never conducted their own study) accepted the dermatologist’s findings and ordered all food banks to discard their venison.” (from the report issued by FSSN: “Firearms Industry Statement on Results of CDC Blood Lead Levels in Hunter’s Study”).

It turns out that the dermatologist is a board member of the Peregrine Fund, not “the independent actions of a concerned hunter, as he claimed.” According to FSSN, this group is dedicated to more than taking the lead out of ammo. They are an anti-hunting group trying to ban hunting.

My Interpretation

I don’t know anything about this group. From a quick reading on Google, they seem to be a group of tree huggers and savers of birds. I’m not into conspiracy theories or worries that everyone is trying to kill the sport of hunting. If the statements about the dermatologist are true (his ties to Peregrine and their mission), I’m angry.

The dermatologist has a license to practice medicine, not his moral agenda. Look at the waste of food and the money spent testing!

When do we start to make people responsible for their actions when they are knowingly dishonest? He used his status as a physician to cry, “Wolf.” Why isn’t he liable for his actions?

He isn’t the only miscreant in this fiasco. Have the state agencies that simply took the word of a single doctor – did no testing of their own – cleaned house yet?  If not, why not?

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Mosey On Over to this Month’s Highlights: Did You Miss Any?

 

A Day at the Office!

A Day at the Office!

 

Perhaps you have just joined this merry band of blog readers and haven’t checked my archives. Well, I’d like to tell you about this month’s hottest!

Most Hits This Month

Hands down, the most popular article this month was: The 10 Commandments of Knife Use and Maintenance.  It received hundreds more hits than any other offering in November!

Going to Other Sites for Amazing Photos

Lots of you are into “Amazing Stories.” This one has gotten a lot of attention:Good Grief! A 30 Point Deer! Shot with a Handmade Long Bow!’

More ‘Lead Poisoning in Venison’ Info

The second salvo in this on going ‘war of words’ emerged this month with: Remember the Lead-in-Venison Controversy? Here’s an Update!’

Stay tuned, later this week, I will report on the CDC’s (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) findings on this issue (that just won’t go away).

Getting Some Reaction

Finally, I’ve been able to prove that someone reads my blog besides my mother. The 4 part report on Shoot or Don’t Shoot Spikes has brought readers out of the woods (pun intended) long enough to comment.

What’s On Tap for December?

Besides the CDC report on lead poisoning in deer, I’ve just completed a 2 parter on ‘Multi-tools.’ Included are some tips on what to look for in a useful-to-you-tool.

Please join me!

There are two ways to get a FREE subscription:  Subscription button for feeds, Click on RSS Feeds (top of right column) or Subscription link to get my postings via email, click on Sign Me Up!

Although these postings/articles are PRICELESS, I’m making them available to YOU for nada (also known as: zip, zilch, zero). Can you really afford to miss out on this opportunity? 😉

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* MDH = My Deer Husband; also known as “He Who Likes to be Obeyed” – sadly he rarely is.

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Remember the Lead-in-Venison Controversy? Here’s an Update!

 

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A Break in the Storm *

 

Reference to:  New Report on Lead-In-Venison & Lead Poisoning (posted on this site 14 October 2008).

What Happened

If you recall, the Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources (DNR) recently issued a “Preliminary Ammunition Study” on  their concern that hunting bullets fragment inside the game and just how far those lead fragments might travel throughout the body.

Although they labeled the report as “preliminary,” they were quick to spread the word. All of this hoopla came from finding some lead in packaged game – donated to food banks in North Dakota, Minnesota and a few other mid-western states.  On the basis of this report, some states collected all of the donated venison and had it destroyed.

My concern was that, from this small sample, Minnesota called lead bullets into question (as reported in the Minnesota newspaper). If you were around during the ‘duck hunting with lead bullets’ controversy, you know why I’ve been watching this issue.

When they found lead in streams and wild duck meat, those lead bullets were ‘dead in the water.’  Up till that time, MDH* could reload his own. The new ammo was SO much more expensive and they could no longer be reloaded at home.

Another View

The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) – the trade association for the firearms, hunting and recreational shooting industry – released the following statement:  “The preliminary report found varying results among bullet types, but noted that in some instances fragments were detected ‘further from the wound channel than many hunters might assume.’

The DNR did not, however, conclude that hunters should not use traditional ammunition. Nor did they conclude that the use of traditional hunting ammunition presents a human health risk to hunters. The DNR noted that its goal was to provide hunters with science-based information on which they can make informed choices” (my emphasis). I think this is called backing down, after you’ve gone too far.

They also note that the Minnesota Department of Agriculture encouraged hunters to continue to donate venison. (Let me see if I understand: hunters pay fees & buy ammo, lease the land, shoot the game, pay for processing & packaging and the state throws it away. Then the state says, “Send more!” Am I missing something?)

More of Their Statement

“For more than a century, hundreds of millions of Americans have safely consumed big game, including whitetail deer, harvested using traditional hunting ammunition and there has never been a case of anyone suffering adverse health effects from consuming the meat. Put simply, there is no credible, peer-reviewed scientific evidence that using traditional hunting ammunition creates a human health risk.”

The CDC is Testing

(More from NSSF) “The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is currently conducting a study of hunters and others that have consumed game to determine whether they have an elevated level of lead in their blood that can be attributed to the ammunition used to harvest the game.”

Iowa Has Been Randomly Testing for 15 Years

(NSSF statement continues) “The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH)  has conducted an extensive panel of blood-lead testing for more than 15 years. Iowa was among the states that did not over react and order venison destroyed.

The IDPH maintained at the time ‘that if lead in venison were a serious health risk, it would likely have surfaced within extensive blood lead testing since 1992 with 500,000 youth under 6 and 25,000 adults having been screened.'”

Essentially, NSSF concluded that, based on the randomness of the results, ‘lead-in-meat’ was probably related to field-dressing and processing issues. I’ll be interested to see how CDC explains this.

Finally

There you have it; another ‘much ado about nothing.’  This is why I refuse to get my knickers bunched about the UV brighteners in hunting clothes.

For your viewing pleasure: The NSSF statement, http://nssf.org/news/PR_idx.cfm?AoI=generic&PRloc=share/PR/&PR=100808_MNDNR.cfm

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* ‘A Break in the Storm’ is used by permission from ClearVue Graphics

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* MDH = My Deer Husband 🙂
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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Report on Lead-In-Venison & Lead Poisoning

Field and Stream‘s blog has an interesting study on the lead left in venison and the possibility of lead poisoning.  Refer here: http://fieldandstream.blogs.com/whitetail365/

Field and Stream got their info from the following article (“Cleaning deer of lead will take more care, DNR* says”) in the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune: http://www.startribune.com/sports/outdoors/30579269.html?page=1&c=y

 

pinchme

Pinch Me! What a Deer!

 

Specifically, lead fragments, too small to feel or taste, break up inside the carcass. An excerpt from the Star Tribune article by Doug Smith:

“Some high-velocity lead bullets break apart almost instantly, throwing small pieces of metal all over the place,” Cornicelli said.

Routine trimming likely will not remove all fragments, and the agency can’t make a recommendation about how far out from the wound to trim. The fragments generally are too small to see, feel or detect while chewing.

The study also found rinsing a carcass tended to reduce lead near the wound channel by about 20 percent, but also spread lead.

The information continues on – http://www.startribune.com/sports/outdoors/30579269.html?page=2&c=y

If you read some of the 44 comments (at the time I wrote this), the comments are all over the place. My fave is the “socialist plot…” However, the person who reminded us of the rush to get rid of lead shot in ducks (and the ensuing HUGE increase in prices), really caught my eye.

Comments anyone?

* DNR = Department of Natural Resources (in Minnesota)

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com