Recipes: Venison Canapes

T’is the Season 

Quick Nibbles are Popular Party Fare!

 

If you have a freezer full of deer meat and holiday guests coming, you can “wow” your friends and relations with venison tidbits!

Here are 2 easy recipes — that will show that you can shoot and cook!  Your crock pot or slow cooker will finish the work and keep things toasty!

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Sweet-and-Sour Venison Meatballs

5 lbs. ground venison

1 lb. ground chuck

1 large onion, minced fine

1 cup Italian style bread crumbs * (see Note after this recipe)

2 eggs, beaten

oil for frying (I use olive oil)

1 quart (32 ozs.) catsup

12 ozs. grape jelly

Mix together venison, ground chuck, finely minced onion and beaten eggs. Mix in enough bread crumbs to keep meat together, forming meatballs.

Cook in oil until done.

In a separate container, mix catsup and jelly.  Heat until the jelly melts. Put meatballs in crock pot and cover with sauce.

Cook 2 – 3 hours on high temperature.

Meatballs are popular fare on a buffet table because they are bite-size.

Note: Instead of purchasing Italian bread crumbs, make your own.  Pulse slices of bread (in a food processor) to = 1 cup crumbs.  Mix 1 teaspoon Italian seasonings to the crumbs.  Use as directed in recipe.

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Polynesian Venison Bites

2 lbs. ground venison (or moose, or elk)

1/2 cup quick uncooked oats

1 can water chestnuts, drained and chopped

2 Tbsp. soy sauce

1 small onion, chopped

1/2 tsp. garlic salt

1 egg

1/2 cup milk

3/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar

2 Tbsp. cornstarch

1 (8 oz.) can crushed pineapple, drained (reserve juice)

1 cup beef bouillon

1/2 cup vinegar

2 Tbsp. soy sauce

1/3 cup green pepper, chopped

Mix the first 8 ingredients and form into small meatballs. Brown in oil and drain well.

Mix brown sugar and cornstarch.  Add juice from pineapple, bouillon, vinegar and soy sauce.  Bring to a boil, stirring constantly until clear and thick.  Boil for 1 minute.  Stir in pineapple and green pepper.

Add sauce to meatballs and simmer 5 to 10 minutes. Serve hot.

Alternate ending (using a slow cooker): After frying, add meatballs to slow cooker.  Pour boiling liquid over meatballs and let the meatballs simmer in the crock pot 1 hour.  Serve hot.

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Thought for the Day:  A penny saved is a government oversight!

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This blog is a companion to my website: GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

 

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Wild Turkey Recipes

A Tough Way to Cook Your Goose!

This is a occasional focus of this blog:  Recipes for Wild Game

Half the fun of catching your own game is preparing it in new ways.

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Fillet of Wild Turkey

1 wild turkey breast, skin removed

Buttermilk *

All-purpose flour

Salt and pepper

olive oil or vegetable oil for frying

Remove breast fillets from wild turkey, using a sharp boning knife.  Cut fillets in 3/8 inch thick slices, cutting across the grain.

Then cut those slices into 2 inch pieces.  Marinate the pieces in buttermilk for at least 2 to 3 hours.

Combine flour, salt and pepper.  Drain turkey slices, dredge in seasoned flour and fry in 1/2 inch (depth) of oil  for 3 – 5 minutes per side, turning once.  Drain on paper towels.

* Note: Buttermilk is a great tenderizer for wild game.  We usually marinate our game in buttermilk overnight.

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And Now, a Word from our Sponsor:

“Providence gave me three sons, only about a year and a half apart; and since it was not possible for me  to give them what we usually call the advantages of wealth, I made up my mind to do my best by them.

I decided primarily to make them sportsmen, for I have a conviction that to be a sportsman is a mighty long step in the direction of being a man.

I thought also that if a man brings up his sons to be hunters, they will never grow away from him.  Rather the passing years will only bring them closer, with a thousand happy memories of the woods and fields.

Again, a hunter never sits around home forlornly, not knowing what in the world to do with his leisure.

His interest in nature will be such that he can delight in every season, and he has resources within himself that will make life always seem worth while.”

Archibald Rutledge *

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Now, Back to our Regularly Scheduled Program:

Wild Turkey Chili

2 and 1/2 lbs. boned turkey, cubed

1 cup chopped onion

1/2 cup chopped green pepper (may use green, red, yellow peppers)

olive oil or vegetable oil

1 Tables. salt

1 Tables. chili powder

1 and 1/2 teasp. garlic powder

2 cups water

1/2 cup Wild Turkey bourbon

4 cups tomato puree

2 pounds kidney beans, cooked and drained **

1 (16 oz.) package Monterey Jack cheese, coarsely grated

Saute turkey cubes, onion and green pepper in oil for 5 – 6 minutes or until turkey is no longer pink and onions are softened.  Stir in seasonings.

Transfer turkey mixture to stockpot (slow cooker – directions below). Add water, bourbon, tomato puree and beans.

Simmer, covered, for 1 hour or longer. Serve each bowl with grated cheese.

Serves:  10 to 12

Crock pot directions: Saute turkey cubes in oil until turkey is no longer pink (in a skillet).

Add onion and green pepper to slow cooker.  Add turkey on top of vegetables.  Add water and bourbon, tomato puree and kidney beans to pot.  Simmer, covered for 6 to 10 hours.

Add spices during the last 30 minutes in the slow cooker. (Adding spices at the beginning will cook the spices away.)

This usually tastes better on the 2nd day!

** Note: In a hurry?  2 cans of kidney beans works fine, instead of cooking your own.

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* Archibald Rutledge (1883-1973), according to Wikipedia, was a South Carolina poet laureate.

He is remembered as one of America’s best-loved outdoor writers. His short stories appeared in Outdoor Life and Field and Stream, plus he wrote more than 50 books including An American Hunter (1937).

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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Tomorrow:  What’s So Great About Camouflage?

Published in: on November 10, 2010 at 1:07 am  Comments Off on Wild Turkey Recipes  
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Recipe: Stuffed Wild Goose

 

Stuffed Wild Goose, On the Wing!

Stuffed Wild Goose, On the Wing!

 

For best taste, field dress a goose immediately.  There’s a super site that demonstrates the best way to clean a variety of fowl.

I suggest you try this: Delta President Rob Olson Demonstrates Techniques to Prepare Ducks for the Table.

Getting Ready to Cook

Young goose is a rare delicacy, with a minimum of waste. The meat is: dark, lean, and oh-so-rich.

Before your hunter leaves for the day, put your order in for a YOUNG goose. Old birds don’t take to most tenderizing methods.

The Marinade

Ducks or geese can be marinated in vinegar, wine or buttermilk. A quick way to get buttermilk is – just add a teaspoon vinegar to each cup of milk, stir and use.

Another marinate: add 1 tsp. salt and 1 Tbsp. vinegar per quart cold water. Immerse the fowl in this solution (in the refrigerator) for 4 – 12 hours, to improve flavor and tenderize.

STUFFED WILD GOOSE

1 young goose, 6-8 months, ready to cook (already marinated)

juice of one lemon

salt and pepper, to taste

1/4 cup butter or margarine

1/4 cup chopped onion

1 cup chopped tart apple

1 cup chopped dried apricots

3 cups soft bread crumbs

4 to 6 slices bacon

Melted bacon fat

Sprinkle goose inside and out with lemon juice, salt and pepper.  Melt butter or margarine in a saucepan. Add onion and cook until tender. Stir in apple, apricots, bread crumbs, salt & pepper.

Spoon stuffing lightly into cavity. Truss bird. Cover breast with bacon slices and cheesecloth soaked in melted bacon fat.

Place goose, breast side up, on rack in roasting pan. Roast @ 325 degrees (20 to 25 minutes/pound), or until tender, basting frequently with bacon fat and drippings in pan.

If age of goose is uncertain, add 1 cup water into pan and cover last hour of cooking. (I’d suggest you ask a goose’s age before shooting him/her.)   😉

Remove cheesecloth, skewers and string. Serves 6 to 8.

A word about the cheesecloth: Wild goose has very little fat. Bacon fat and basting — are two things that moisturize the meat, and keep it from drying out.

To that end, cheesecloth is a convenient way to keep a layer of fat on the bird during cooking.

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

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My Wild Game Recipe Collection – Thus Far

 

Here's The Whole Shebang!

Here's The Whole Enchilada!

 

These recipes have been spread out over so many months, you may  have missed some.

  • Just Ducky – Wild Duck – Chesapeake Barbecued                                          Duck and Roasted Wild Duck
  • 2 Ways with Venison – Pecan-Crusted Venison, Tex-                                    Mex Venison
  • Deer Chili in a Slow Cooker “Brazos River Bottom                                     Killed-on-the-Road Texas Chili” and LBJ’s River Chili

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com

Recipe: Turning Wild Birds into Fine Dining

 

Wild Birds are Fine Dining, at its Best!

 

The time you spend marinating wild birds will be worth the effort when you get to the dinner table.  Fish-eating ducks call for a marinade of vinegar, wine or buttermilk. Older duck or goose will be more flavorful after a bath in (1/2 tsp. salt and 1 Tbsp. vinegar per quart of) cold water.  Leave the ducks in this marinade 4 – 12 hours in the refrigerator – to improve tenderness and flavor.

General Wild Duck Info

Duck meat is best cooked rare.  The meat is dark, dense and dry. That’s why you see so many recipes calling for cooking duck in a covered roaster with several slices of bacon spread over the duck body. Another option is to use a slow cooker with your duck(s). All of these strategies help retain moisture in an otherwise dry meat. Lots of folks are surprised to find that wild duck can be barbecued. However, the most common way to cook wild ducks is to dredge them through flour and spices, fry the outside and smother in gravy and bake for 3 or 4 hours.

Wild Goose

The great thing about wild goose is that there is so little waste with this bird. Young bird is absolutely delicious while older birds tend to be tough and poor prospects for tenderizing with moist heat. Therefore, next time you go hunting, make sure you get a young one!   😉  You know you have an old goose when you see: pinfeathers, very large wing spurs and overall -rather coarse feathers.**

Stuff the goose with your choice: sliced tart apples OR breaded stuffing with tart apples and onions. I’ll end this posting with one of my favorite duck recipes. Next time I add recipes, I’ll include: Chesapeake Barbecued Duck and Roasted Wild Duck.   But today’s recipe is:

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Holly Gravy Duck

1 cup quality oil

1 cup flour

4 cups water

Make a dark roux with the oil and flour (this requires time and nearly constant stirring). The roux – when ready – is the color of an old penny. Take the roux off heat, let cool for a few minutes (5 – 10) {this is to lower the temperature of the pot so you aren’t scalded when you add the water}, put back on stove and add water and seasonings:

2 Tbsp. celery seed                           dash of pepper

1 Tbsp. salt per duck                        1 Tbsp. chili powder per duck

1 clove garlic per duck

Stir until spices are dispersed and gravy starts to thicken. Pour this gravy over the ducks in the roaster, cover and cook @ 350 degrees for 3 or 4 hours.

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**There’s more info on pin feathers and wing spurs in this article:  “What do Pin Feathers on a Duck Look Like?”

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This blog is a companion to my website:  GreatGhilliesAndGraphics.com